Guinness
Bodhranii - Irish Drum

Guinness

In the latter part of this century Ireland has well and truly put itself on the map in terms of food. Of course, the thing that most springs to mind when you think of Ireland is Guinness!

Guinness has a very long history and can trace its roots back to 1759. It is a family business and was made by the Guinness family. It originates from St James Gateway in the city of Dublin and is a dry stout beer. Guinness has become phenomenally successful worldwide and in Ireland is the most popular alcoholic drink and its profits are in excess of 2 billion a year.

Guinness hasn't become so popular without having a distinctive taste and in this cases its roasted barley, which remain unfermented in the beer. The beer is mixed with Nitrogen as it is poured and this accounts for the thick and creamy head which is a distinctive trademark of a pint of Guinness.

Guinness has a high calorific value but researchers have shown that it may actually have some health boosting properties. They have found a high level of antioxidants in the beer that are similar to some fruit and vegetables, and this may actually assist the body in reducing the amount of fat that is deposited in the arteries of the body.

Many well known mixed drinks contain Guinness:-

Black and Tan is Guinness mixed with a pale lager.
Black Velvet is an equal measure of both Guinness and Champagne (an alternative to this is the 'poor mans' version which is cider and Guinness in equal amounts). This is also sometimes called a Guinness snakebite.
Guinness and black - a pint of Guinness with a small measure of blackcurrant cordial poured in. most people put the blackcurrant in last but if put in first it makes the head of the Guinness turn purple.
Irish car bomb - a shared shot (equal measures) of Irish cream and whiskey is put into a half pint size glass of Guinness.
Black Russian - coke with a shot of Tia Maria and a shot of vodka - the Irish put a Guinness top on this.
Guinness shandy - with lemonade.